Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information, insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#854262
Acleris emargana - Notch-wing Button 3559 - Acleris effractana

Acleris emargana - Notch-wing Button 3559 - Acleris effractana
Bay Center 98527 Willapa, Pacific County, Washington, USA
September 2, 2012
Size: Wingspan ~19mm
Wingspan ~19mm
F#3824
RWWA-3825 BOLD DNA All matches from 96-99.2% for Acleris (formally Pyralis) emargana (Fabricius 1775) or cf. A. emargana and a couple for Acleris effractana (Hübner, 1799). DNA has shown Acleris emargana is found from Europe to Siberia, northern China, Korea and Japan and in North America. A. effractana seems to be used as the North American species contrary to DNA indicating A. emargana in NA plus A. effractana is found in Europe also. The data strongly suggests A. emargana and A. effractana are synonyms of a species which exhibits a high degree of polymorphism like certain other tortricids.
http://www.boldsystems.org/index.php/Taxbrowser_Taxonpage?taxon=Acleris+emargana+&searchTax=
http://www.boldsystems.org/index.php/Taxbrowser_Taxonpage?taxon=Acleris+effractana&searchTax=

Collection Locality: Coastal SW Washington State at the edge of Willapa Bay geo:lat=46 37.273 geo:lon=-123

Moved
Moved from Acleris.

Guide page?
Should I create a page for this species?

 
Thanks ..
I just requested that ... how do the folks there feel? I would appreciate a page and feel we really do have Acleris emargana at least along the north west coast.

 
Acleris effractana
Acleris effractana (Hübner, 1799) replaces A. emargana in the US. Recently given species status based on genitalia. The group is highly variable. I will the reference.

 
I do not subscribe to that.
Where is there a reference? On what basis was the replacement? The DNA data suggests they are the same and A. emargana (Fabricius 1775) would take priority. That and the matches are better for the specimens from here to Acleris emargana. It might be what you would like but the evidence does not support. Remember, A. effractana is also described from Europe and not exclusive to US or better yet North America.

I take it a page will not be created. I would request you leave emargana as the name on the specimens I have posted. There are four others posted prior to today and all closely related by DNA. If keeping them in Acleris is your call .. so be it. Be careful when making a species call based on geography.

 
by genitalia
I think this is the paper, but I have not looked at it recently. Karsholt, et al (2005) (1)

 
Thanks....
... for the interesting paper by Karsholt, et al., on these two species. Guess it best to let both species stand and indeed BOLD does recognizes each but with only a few specimens of A. effractana. Others can decide (perhaps in the future) whether an interbreeding population might include both and they in turn just represent host morphs, sibling species, geographic or seasonal separation or similar within the population. Flight time might prove to be a clue … quite a range here. Not a genital person so that is not a factor to me.

I thus do not feel we can exclude A. emargana from NA (especially the NW) nor A. effractana from Europe and Asia. With my limited expertise it does not seem we can separate the two different Acleris by DNA easily either. Both could be part of a natural population in the same area so the question might turn out to be; is it an interbreeding one as the DNA sequences seem to indicate? Anyone with a specimen would probably be OK to put either/or in the label. Interesting stuff.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.