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Photo#85537
Biting Midge - Forcipomyia - male

Biting Midge - Forcipomyia - Male
Kerrville, Kerr County, Texas, USA
October 30, 2006
Size: 1 mm
I'm confident now that this is indeed a Ceratopogonid Biting Midge. I have moved it to the family level of the guide.

....Ed....

Images of this individual: tag all
Biting Midge - Forcipomyia - male Biting Midge - Forcipomyia - male

Moved
Moved from Biting Midges.

not a mosquito
I am pretty sure this is a male Ceratopogonid

 
And Omar...
Would this be a male?

....Ed....

 
yes
its male. I was trying to read a little on the internet about them to refresh myself but I couldn't find much. I cant recall if the males are blood feeders like the females. I want to say no they aren't, but I am not sure

 
Thanks again
Thanks again, Omar.

apparently, males do not feed on blood. Our guide for the family states:

"Adult females suck blood from other insects, reptiles, and mammals (including humans), but also feed on flower nectar or other sugar source; females of some species have atrophied mouthparts, and probably don't suck blood; all males feed only on sugars".

....Ed....

 
oh
DUUUUUUHH, I should have checked that. lol

 
Thanks!
Thank you much, Omar. I checked Ceratopogonidae in the guide, and the head shape is right. Love those plumose antennae!

....Ed....

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