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Species Bourletiella hortensis - Garden Springtail

Globular Springtail - Bourletiella hortensis Campsite Bugs - Bourletiella hortensis Bourletiella hortensis? - Bourletiella hortensis Bourletiella hortensis? - Bourletiella hortensis Bourletiella hortensis? - Bourletiella hortensis Speck on compost bin - Bourletiella hortensis Bourletiella hortensis Unknown globular - Bourletiella hortensis
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Collembola (Springtails and allies)
Order Symphypleona (Globular Springtails)
Superfamily Sminthuroidea
Family Bourletiellidae
Genus Bourletiella
Species hortensis (Garden Springtail)
Explanation of Names
Bourletiella hortensis (Fitch, 1863)
Range
An holarctic species recorded from Japan, Russia, Europe, USA, Vietnam, Australia, Hawaii, New Zealand, and South Africa. Originally described from New York in 1863 by Fitch in gardens on leaves and soil. Considered invasive in this country. (Capinera, John L. North American Vegetable Pests. The Pattern of Invasion. American Entomologist. Spring 2002)
Habitat
A very common species in gardens
Remarks
More resistant against dehydration then most other Collembola, so it can be found in dry locations

May become harmful to young crops if present in large quantities. It is one of the few Collembola that are considered a pest in agriculture/horticulture when present in large quantities