Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information, insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#861866
Spider ID request - Antrodiaetus montanus

Spider ID request - Antrodiaetus montanus
Tri-Cities Area, South Eastern Washington State County, Washington, USA
November 2, 2013
Size: fifty cent piece
found inside my sisters home

Images of this individual: tag all
Spider ID request - Antrodiaetus montanus Spider ID request - Antrodiaetus montanus Spider ID request - Antrodiaetus montanus Spider ID request - Antrodiaetus montanus Spider ID request - Antrodiaetus montanus

From Rod Crawford:
A. montanus would be my best guess. The unmodified first metatarsus rules out pugnax and hageni, which leaves pacificus and montanus (and something unknown). The leg segment proportions support montanus, as far as I can tell. A top or inside view of the front tibia would have helped, as I can't see the male spine group too clearly in these images. It looks a bit slender for montanus, but then I've only seen a couple of adult males.


Moved from Spiders.

Spiders measurement does not include the legs. If you still have the spider can you give us a measurement in mm?

A. montanus?
I'm thinking this is A. montanus. The new tibia shot should rule out some of the species. Based on images here...
http://crawford.tardigrade.net/journal/album7015.html
... I think A. occultus is dark.

Just for confirmation, any chance of getting a shot of the first leg tibia from the other side? That is, the inner face of it. As low an angle as possible would be great. :)

 
New shot
Unfortunately the leg is out of focus... I'm still thinking what we can see of the tibia/metatarsus shape and setae distribution matches A. montanus best, but would like to wait for a second opinion. See figures here:
http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/4753451#page/414/mode/1up

 
A. montanus
I hope you're right. It would be a great new addition to the guide. I'll email Rod and see what he thinks.

spider
Two other spiders identical to this one with the same light coloration have been seen in the area where this one was collected.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

This is a harmless male Mygalomorph. I'd guess it's something like



Your specimen is more lightly colored, so I'm not sure if that's due to molting or if it's the other species found in the area? A good view of the first tibia (leg one) from the side would help be certain.

 
Antrodiaetus
Looks like a male Antrodiaetus to me too. A. montanus is light I think. There are a couple others on the WA checklist that I'm not sure about, like A. hageni.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.