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Photo#862094
True Bugs (Heteroptera) ID Request - Phytocoris unnamed-two

True Bugs (Heteroptera) ID Request - Phytocoris unnamed-two
Camp Wood, Edwards County, Texas, USA
November 1, 2013

Images of this individual: tag all
True Bugs (Heteroptera) ID Request - Phytocoris unnamed-two True Bugs (Heteroptera) ID Request - Phytocoris unnamed-two

.
After all this discussion, I will certainly be looking for another one and capture it!

I believe
this is Phytocoris squamosus Knight.

 
Great!
P. squamosus belongs to candidus group, and so it may be similar to .
Schuh describes, "Most similar to albidosquamus but differs by the dense brush of long, pale setae on the ventral surface of antennal segment I, red or reddish brown markings on the collar and calli..." (1)
I am worried that the red markings are not shown in this bug.

 
Good point
It would be hard to tell which of those two species this one is, without a view of the ventral side of the first antennomere. Wouldn't this one be a few hundred miles east of the limits of its known range if it turns out to be P. albidosquamosus? That would be interesting.

I think the one you thumbnailed there is more clearly P. squamosus, because the brush of setae on the antenna is quite apparent, in addition to the red markings on the pronotum, as mentioned by Stonedahl (1988).

 
Thanks, Jason!
^^

 
.
I am flattered by your attention to my "bug". That would be quite an exciting ID!

 
Glad to help (hope I'm right!)
Your post came to my attention because I collected some very-similar-looking specimens in NM (which I'll post soon), and with the benefit of the specimens in hand, it was possible to key them out.

 
.
Whoopee!

Moved
Moved from Phytocoris.

Moved
Moved from Plant Bugs.

 
Thank you
for the placement. It is a little odd in shape, but now I can see it.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

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