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Photo#86335
Which Leaf-footed Bug? - Narnia femorata

Which Leaf-footed Bug? - Narnia femorata
Kerrville, Kerr County, Texas, USA
November 8, 2006
Size: 14 mm
Found this Coreid in my garden today. It doesn't appear to be Leptoglossus oppositus, and it's certainly not a Western Conifer Seed Bug in Texas.

I went through Leptoglossus and Anasa in the guide, but couldn't find a match.

Images of this individual: tag all
Which Leaf-footed Bug? - Narnia femorata Which Leaf-footed Bug? - Narnia femorata

Moved
Moved from Subgenus Narnia.

Moved
Moved from Narnia.

Moved
Moved from Leaffooted Bugs. I consider below contributions as sufficient.

Showing up in the East
I have read that Western Conifer Seed Bugs are showing up in the East, and I think I found one in Maryland, so they might be in Texas.

With that yellow pronotum, I wonder if it's Narnia?
None of the ones in the guide have such large tibial dilations (projections on the legs), but check out this one.

 
Thanks, Hannah.
I wonder if the V-shaped white mark on the tibial dilations is diagnostic of anything. The yellowish brown pronotum certainly does match Narina, particularly on the TAMU specimen that you referenced.

BTW, there are quite a few Prickly Pear cactus here on my property.

....Ed....

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