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Photo#864365
Long-headed Toothpick Grasshopper  - Achurum carinatum - female

Long-headed Toothpick Grasshopper - Achurum carinatum - Female
Titusville, Brevard County, Florida, USA
November 9, 2013
Size: 50 mm
Click on the following link to view larger on Flickr

Images of this individual: tag all
Long-headed Toothpick Grasshopper  - Achurum carinatum - female Long-headed Toothpick Grasshopper  - Achurum carinatum - female Long-headed Toothpick Grasshopper - Achurum carinatum - female

This is Achurum carinatum
A few things that help recognize this one include the somewhat concave face, with the eyes parallel to the face, the very thick antennae that look almost like continuations of the head. The head extends further beyond the eyes than in other species found in Florida. The points sticking back from the "knees" of the hind legs are distinctive. This species also has very short wings which never develop beyond what they are on this individual. And, of course, there is where it was found.
Moved from Grasshoppers, Crickets, Katydids.

 
Achurum carinatum
Thanks David.
Sometimes I get out on the wrong limb of the genus tree,
and can't find my way back to the right one.
This is definitely a better match than Leptysma marginicollis hebardi.

Moved
Moved from Leptysma marginicollis marginicollis.
I was basing the ID on range, but now that you mention it, this does look a bit odd. Let's let the experts decide.

Moved

 
Leptysma marginicollis marginicollis
Brandon:
The hopper in my image seems a little odd for the Leptysma marginicollis marginicollis ID.
The things that get my attention are:
The hopper I captured has a squarish thorax that has distinct corners and flat sides, but all the images of Leptysma marginicollis marginicollis on BugGuide have a rounded (cylindrical) thorax.
The antennae on the hopper I posted have flat sides that look much more like the antennae on the hopper (http://bugguide.net/node/view/225216/bgimage) identified as Leptysma marginicollis hebardi.
The head on the hopper I posted is much longer and narrower than all of the images for both species except for image 225216.
The Hopper I posted seems not to have (or has yet to develop) wings.
The hopper I posted has no light stripe down it’s side like almost all of the images of either species.

Is it possible that this is not either species, but another species or a hybrid?

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