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Photo#868692
Parasitic (phoretic?) mites on a Phoridae - Trombidium

Parasitic (phoretic?) mites on a Phoridae - Trombidium
Mont St-Bruno, Montérégie County, Quebec, Canada
August 20, 2012
Size: 0.3 mm
It was found attached to the leg of a Phoridae probably of the genus Megaselia.

Images of this individual: tag all
Parasitic (phoretic?) mites on a Phoridae - Trombidium Parasitic (phoretic?) mite on a Phoridae - Trombidium Parasitic (phoretic?) mite on a Phoridae Parasitic (phoretic?) mite on a Phoridae - Trombidium Parasitic (phoretic?) mite on a Phoridae - Trombidium

Moved
Moved from Mites and Ticks.

Moved
Moved from Beetles.

mite?
Most likely a mite. I would move either to mites or to arthropod level. I don't think it belongs here.

 
Parasitengona
It is a larval parasitengone (Acari: Prostigmata: Parasitengona) of the superfamily Trombidioidea. Unfortunately, I'm out of town and don't have a copy of Krantz & Walter handy to figure out the family, but the very broad prodorsal shield looks diagnostic. Regardless of the family, it is a parasite rather than just being phoretic.

Happy Solstice,
Heather

 
Yes mite!
I just take a look at it under the microscope (pictures added), and it is definitely a mite. What I first taught to be antennae are macrosetae and the apparent segmentation is cause by two seperposed dorsal plates. Anyway, it is still very different than the usual mites I found on insects.

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