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Species Oiketicus toumeyi - Hodges#0452

Thyridopteryx species? - Oiketicus toumeyi Bag moth? - Oiketicus toumeyi - male
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Tineoidea (Tubeworm, Bagworm, and Clothes Moths)
Family Psychidae (Bagworm Moths)
Subfamily Oiketicinae
Genus Oiketicus
Species toumeyi (Oiketicus toumeyi - Hodges#0452)
Hodges Number
0452
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Oiketicus toumeyi Jones, 1922
Explanation of Names
Named for Dr. J.W. Toumey who was the first person to mention the species in a publication. He referred to the species as "Thyteryx sp." and noted they were very abundant in locust trees near Tucson, Arizona.
Numbers
Three species of the genus Oiketicus occur in America north of Mexico. (1), (2)
Size
Davis (1964) reports the wingspan 28-35 mm. (3)
Jones (1922) reports 28-32 mm.
*Females are wingless.
Identification

          ♂
Range
Arizona to western Texas and southern Mexico. (3)
Holotype ♂ from Tucson, Pima County, Arizona, 19 June 1918 by F.M. Jones.
Season
The main flight period appears to be April to June. (4)
Food
Davis (1964) reports nine host plants. (3)
Baccharis ramulosa A. Gray
Mimosa sp.
Juniperus sempervirens = [Cupressus sempervirens] L. (Italian cypress)
Robinia neomexicana A. Gray (New Mexico locust)
Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC. (mesquite)
Prunus armeniaca L. (apricot).
Pyrus malus = [Prunus armeniaca L. (apricot)
Sapindus sp. (soapberry).
Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle (tree of heaven)
Neck (1959) adds Fouquieria splendens Engelm. (ocotillo) to the list from Texas.
Life Cycle
Olson (2004)(4) describes the life cycle including a photo of the larval case. preview page at Google Books.
Print References
Davis, D.R. 1964. Bagworm moths of the Western Hemisphere (Lepidoptera: Psychidae). United States National Museum Bulletin 244. p. 109; figs. 46, 47, 98, 99, 238, 239, 314, 350; Map 10. (3)
Jones, F.M., 1922. A New North American Psychid (Lep. Psychidae.). Entomological News. 33. p. 12.
Neck, R. 1959. Oiketicus toumeyi: A bagworm moth new to the Texas fauna (Psychidae). Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society. 30(3). p. 218Full text PDF
Works Cited
1.Check list of the Lepidoptera of America north of Mexico.
Hodges, et al. (editors). 1983. E. W. Classey, London. 284 pp.
2.North American Moth Photographers Group
3.Bagworm Moths of the Western Hemisphere
Donald R. Davis. 1964. Smithsonian Institution.
4.50 Common Insects of the Southwest
Carl E. Olson. 2004. Western National Parks Association.
5.BOLD: The Barcode of Life Data Systems