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Photo#881623
Legionary Ant male, anterior head - Neivamyrmex mandibula - male

Legionary Ant male, anterior head - Neivamyrmex mandibula - Male
Madera Canyon, Santa Cruz County, Arizona, USA
July 26, 2013
Size: 12.9 mm
Download high resolution image here.

This image is from a CombineZP processed set of 218 images with a 23 µm step taken with a Nikon CFI LU Plan Fluor 5×/0.15 ∞/0 mm microscope objective + Nikon 200 mm F/4 AIS telephoto lens + Nikon D300 camera (magnification 5×; technique described here)

Images of this individual: tag all
Legionary Ant male, lateral - Neivamyrmex mandibula - male Legionary Ant male, dorsal - Neivamyrmex mandibula - male Legionary Ant male, ventral - Neivamyrmex mandibula - male Legionary Ant male, dorso-lateral head - Neivamyrmex mandibula - male Legionary Ant male, lateral head - Neivamyrmex mandibula - male Legionary Ant male, anterior head - Neivamyrmex mandibula - male Legionary Ant male, latero-ventral genitalia - Neivamyrmex mandibula - male

Moved
Moved from Legionary Ants.

This is Neivamyrmex mandibula
This is Neivamyrmex mandibularis, workers are unknown for this species but thought to be either N. melanocephalus or N. graciellae. Very nice shots.

 
Thanks!
I will request a species page in the Request forum, and move the set.

 
Glad to help, your specimen l
Glad to help, your specimen lends evidence to the thought that this may be the male of N. graciellae. The only U.S. material I have seen of graciellae is from Florida cyn.

 
Neivamyrmex males vs. workers.
Neivamyrmex were abundant on and around the illuminated sheets during the gathering_2013 event at the top of Madera Canyon Rd. on July 26, 2013. I don't know how many were N. mandibula, and cannot tell if the other posted photos from the event are of that species. If I lived nearby, I would go digging around the nearby forest for their transient nests next July looking for males prior to dispersal to help identify the worker. Perhaps this post will motivate those who do live nearby to do so.

I see from your paper(1) that there are several other species of Neivamyrmex that live in central and north-central NM, where I process detritus samples with a Berlese funnel on a regular basis. I will keep an eye out for the males (with their distinctive sausage-shaped gasters) and attempt to firm up other worker associations, such as for N. minor and N. swainsonii.

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