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Photo#88597
Thread-Legged Bug - Empicoris? - Empicoris rubromaculatus

Thread-Legged Bug - Empicoris? - Empicoris rubromaculatus
Ascension Parish, Louisiana, USA
Size: ~7mm

Images of this individual: tag all
Thread-Legged Bug - Empicoris? - Empicoris rubromaculatus Thread-Legged Bug - Empicoris? - Empicoris rubromaculatus Thread-Legged Bug - Empicoris? - Empicoris rubromaculatus Thread-Legged Bug - Empicoris? - Empicoris rubromaculatus

Empicoris rubromaculatus (Blackburn 1889)
based on desc'n in Slater & Baranowski 1978, p. 133
Moved from Empicoris.

Thanks again!
This image is stunning! I especially appreciate the soft down-cast shadow in this particular image. Did you use a flash or just a bright light. If I were to offer an improvement I would say that a fill flash set on the lens would help to brighten up the body of the animal just a bit. Maybe even timing the fill flash to go off toward the end of the exposure to ensure that the delicate features are not washed out.

Moved
Moved from Thread-legged Bugs.

Shure looks like it but...
I submitted one that looks identical a few days ago that Eric identified as Stenolemus.
:

....Ed....

 
Hi Ed,

To be honest, I used the ID for Joyce Gross' individual here on the BugGuide site. There isn't much information available on the net for these. There are very few good images.

 
Hard to ID.
My identification should be considered very tentative! I have not seen very many examples of any of the Emesinae. They just aren't found very often by the casual entomologist, even though they must be quite common.

 
Stenolemus vs Empicoris
I'll check the collections at UCB again in the near future and see if I can describe the difference between the 2 genera -- at least in terms of California species. I only remember that Empicoris sp. was the only possible choice for mine.

 
verdict?
Did you ever come to a conclusion, Joyce? How does one distinguish this species from other members of the subfamily? Is the red stigma (pterostigma?) diagnostic for this species?

 
I was wrong!
Hard to imagine, I know (hahaha)! This has been identified as Empicoris by Jeff Bradshaw, who used these images to help illustrate a talk he gave at the Heteropterist's Society annual meeting in Indianpolis this past week. Nice images, Joyce!

Neat bug!
Hard to get all those gangly legs into the picture :-)

 
As much as this bug moved, it was difficult to get any part of it into the picture. :)

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