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Species Austrotyla stephensoni

ZE.26806_Austrotyla_stephensoni - Austrotyla stephensoni - male ZE.26806_Austrotyla_stephensoni - Austrotyla stephensoni - male ZE.26806_Austrotyla_stephensoni - Austrotyla stephensoni - male
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Myriapoda (Myriapods)
Class Diplopoda (Millipedes)
Order Chordeumatida
Family Conotylidae
Genus Austrotyla
Species stephensoni (Austrotyla stephensoni)
Explanation of Names
"This species epithet honors Jeff Stephenson, who has helped with hundreds of cave life specimens including many new species, and who is very supportive of cave life life research as Collections Manager for the Zoology Department at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science."
Identification
"Austrotyla stephensoni differs from every other species of Austrotyla in the notched or bifid, coxites of the posterior gonopods (Fig. 10). From A. coloradensis it further differs in the markedly reduced posterior lobe of the anterior gonopods (cf. Figs 5, 6.) and the form of the fimbriate branches, which are larger and more strongly curved, and in having fewer ocelli, proportionally longer legs and antennae, and being depigmented (troglobiotic syndrome). In addition, the femoral knobs of the male third and forth legs of colordensis are distal, while in some stephensoni they are mesal (cf. Figs. 3, 4, 7, 8)."