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Photo#89152
Flotilla of globular springtails - Dicyrtomina minuta

Flotilla of globular springtails - Dicyrtomina minuta
Nashua, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
November 30, 2006
Size: 1.0 - 1.9 mm
There is quite a variety of coloration and markings among what I presume are members of the same species.

Images of this individual: tag all
Flotilla of globular springtails - Dicyrtomina minuta Flotilla of globular springtails - Dicyrtomina minuta Flotilla of globular springtails - Dicyrtomina minuta Flotilla of globular springtails - Dicyrtomina minuta Flotilla of globular springtails - Dicyrtomina minuta Flotilla of globular springtails - Dicyrtomina minuta Flotilla of globular springtails - Dicyrtomina minuta Flotilla of globular springtails - Dicyrtomina minuta Dicyrtomina ornata - Dicyrtomina minuta

Moved
Moved from Dicyrtomina ornata.

New US species?
Pending confirmation, this may be the first record of this species in the US.

Moved

Dicyrtomina ornata
Hi Jim. The most important invariable characteristic in the quite variable pigment pattern is the dark more or less rectangular patch at their butts, typical for D. ornata.
Look carefully at the shape of this patch. If you find specimens with a patch shaped as a multi-barred cross, you have found a close relative: Dicyrtomina saundersi. Checkout collembola.org for a picture of such a specimen. Look carefully for the butts...
Note that saundersi is not yet reported from the USA. So, you can be the first to find them ;-)
Good hunting ;-)

Good stuff. Fun, too.
Thanks for the info about putting them in water. If I can ever find these critters, I'll remember that. Any hints on how to liberate them after the shoot?

This particular shot is my second favorite, ranking close to the threesome with its repeat-and-variation theme. Do you use a springtail wrangler to get them lined up? LOL!

 
Liberation
I plan to set these free in the yard. I live on 1.8 acres with lots of trees and vegetation with enough diversity for springtails to make a living. I figure if I bring in new species, I'm building up the biodiversity of this place.

Condo livers or those with meticulously manicured grounds will have to take a hike to find suitable habitat.

 
Thanks again
I'll puttem where I foundem.

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