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Photo#893365
Buprestis aurulenta

Buprestis aurulenta
Yellow Point, Nanaimo, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
February 12, 2014
Found on fly screen of window. The silhouette turned into a real jewel when I got closer! Adds February to BC.

Moved
Moved from Beetles.

Emergence
This is extremely early for it to emerge, particularly that far north and with the cold temperatures of late. Of course January was mild. Was the critter found on the inside or outside of the screen? If inside, it could be a case of delayed emergence from wood used in construction. The earliest record we have in the collection is almost exactly the same date, but it was taken inside a house. Otherwise, we have one from 12 March--also possibly from inside--and several in April.

 
inside
It was on the inside of the screen and the small cottage and all furniture where I found it was built entirely of wood from the property so it is possible it emerged from that or the firewood. Given all the other dates it seems like delayed emergence is the most likely.

 
Emergence
Excellent! There is a fair amount literature on this species, and it has been documented that a larva can take several decades to emerge as an adult. I have collected adults in the field during April in SW Oregon, notably feeding on the growing tips of pine. That included males, which to find is rare compared to the female. I have seen beetles in early may at the Oregon Coast, which is much cooler than inland.

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