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Photo#893434
Springtail - Proisotoma minuta

Springtail - Proisotoma minuta
Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada
January 26, 2014
Size: .54 mm
After reviewing the other photos, I suspect the white spots of light in the eye patch are indicative of setae rather than the lenses of any ocelli, which may be to small to resolve.

Images of this individual: tag all
Springtail - Proisotoma minuta Springtail - Proisotoma minuta Springtail - Proisotoma minuta Springtail - Proisotoma minuta Springtail - Proisotoma minuta Springtail - Proisotoma minuta Springtail - Proisotoma minuta Springtail - Proisotoma minuta Springtail - Proisotoma minuta Springtail - Proisotoma minuta

Moved

Proisotoma minuta, juvenile
Adults are about 1.1 mm.
Great series!
Note, the ocelli are rather large. They should resolve easily using your equipment/illumination technique. P. minuta has 8 ocelli per eyepatch. Also ocellar setae are present, at least in adults. Ocelli of Collembola do not have a cuticular lens (as in insects). They do contain internally a spherical glass crystal to concentrate the light at the optic cells. From the outside the ocellus is recognized as a domeshaped structure called the 'corneula'. A transparant cuticula covers the glass crystal. Some ocelli do neither have a crystal nor a corneula and thus are only subcuticular (not visible) as in Tomocerus.
See collembola.org/publicat/integum/corneula.htm (in preparation) for a short intro on corneula cuticular covers.

 
Thanks
I didn't make the connection with my previously posted P. minuta because the previous specimen carried themselves much different, probably because they were older/more elongate. I recall they seemed to drag their abdomen and mold to the contour of the surfaces more so than this one, which holds itself well above the surface.

Thanks for the link, I really enjoy learning as I explore and hopefully others do as well. My camera equipment is far more a stroke of luck than money spent so I'm rather tickled that it works as well as it does. The ocelli/setae resolution of the eye patch depends on too many variables such as the angle of the shot and glare, which I don't have good enough control over.

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