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Photo#89384
Pogonognathellus flavescens? - Pogonognathellus

Pogonognathellus flavescens? - Pogonognathellus
Nashua, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
November 28, 2006
Size: about 3.5 mm
Well I pestered it alright. The springtail never even tried to jump as i touched it repeatedly with the fine bristles of my small watercolor paintbrush. All I succeeded in doing was brushing off the rest of its scales, revealing its very yellow integument. Perhaps *now* it's possible to confirm this as P. flavescens.

Images of this individual: tag all
Pogonognathellus flavescens? - Pogonognathellus Pogonognathellus flavescens? - Pogonognathellus Pogonognathellus flavescens? - Pogonognathellus Pogonognathellus flavescens? - Pogonognathellus Pogonognathellus flavescens? - Pogonognathellus Pogonognathellus flavescens? - Pogonognathellus Pogonognathellus flavescens? - Pogonognathellus

Moved

Moved
Moved from Tomoceridae.

It certainly looks yellow...
So that is a first indication it could be P.flavescens. Another key characteristic is the length of its antennae. They should be shorter than its body. Assuming it is the same specimen as the other pictures I vote for P.flavescens.

The fact that the specimen did not want to jump away when disturbed can be an indication it was in moulting stage. Then springtails simply cannot move as their muscles are detached from their exoskeleton... This condition may take an hour, untill the new skin is completed, muscles are reattached to it, and then the cuticula will burst dorsally at its thorax and the specimen will have to struggle for about another hour to get out of its old skin.

 
Info
Thank you, Frans, for this information-rich response.

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