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Photo#898256
Hemiptera IMG_3833 - Brachysteles parvicornis

Hemiptera IMG_3833 - Brachysteles parvicornis
Merepoint, Brunswick, Cumberland County, Maine, USA
August 20, 2012

Images of this individual: tag all
Hemiptera IMG_3833 - Brachysteles parvicornis Hemiptera IMG_3833 - Brachysteles parvicornis

i think i got it guys
loitering ad nauseam around eurosites pays off

Moved from Cardiastethus.

 
ID confirmed by T.J. Henry

 
Thanks V!
--

 
no thank you, Steve
great find! despite its being an alien here, this bug is quite uncommon anywhere, be it the native or non-native part of its range

Tom Henry's opinion: "I would say Cardiastethus sp."
Moved from Plant Bugs.

 
In Anthocorids of Canada, the
In Anthocorids of Canada, the antenna of Cardiastethus has the apical 2 segments finer than the previous segments and with hairs that are longer than the diameter of the segment, so I would discount Cardiastethus. As with previous Anthocorids, trying to narrow it down without a decent ventral shot is difficult but I would hedge my id as a Tetraphleps species.

 
Blow Up Added
Not sure if it helps. It seems that the last two segments are thinner and the hairs may be longer than the diameter of the segments. But then again I though this was in Miridae. I was wondering why I couldn't find it. ; )

Thank you both!

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