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Genus Metzneria

moth - Metzneria lappella Moth - Metzneria lappella Moth - Metzneria lappella Burdock Seedhead Moth - Metzneria lappella Gelechiidae: Metzneria lappella - Metzneria lappella Burdock seedhead moth - Metzneria lappella Gelechiid - Metzneria lappella Gelechiid - Metzneria lappella
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Gelechioidea (Twirler Moths and kin)
Family Gelechiidae (Twirler Moths)
Subfamily Anomologinae
Genus Metzneria
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Metzneria Zeller, 1939; in Busck, Proc. USNM, v.25, pp.773
Numbers
2 species in North America listed at All-Leps
Size
wingspan of M. lappella 12-19 mm (1)
Range
throughout United States and southern Canada
also represented by several species in Eurasia
Habitat
fields, roadsides, waste places
Season
adults fly in June and July in the north; April to August in the south
larvae in late summer, fall, and spring (overwinter)
Food
larvae of M. lappella feed on developing seeds of burdock (Arctium spp.)
larvae of M. paucipunctella feed on developing seeds of knapweed (Centaurea spp.)
Life Cycle
one generation per year; overwinters as a larva in seedhead of hostplant; pupates in spring inside seedhead
Remarks
both species are native to Eurasia; M. paucipunctella was intentionally introduced in the 1970s to northwestern states and British Columbia in an attempt to control knapweed
Internet References
pinned adult images of both species by Jim Vargo (Moth Photographers Group)
pinned adult image of M. lappella by SangMi Lee (Moth Photographers Group)
7 pinned adult images of M. lappella, plus collection site map (All-Leps)
live adult image of M. paucipunctella (Neal Spencer, USDA, insectimages.org)
live adult images of M. lappella, plus decription, foodplant, flight dates (Lynn Scott, Ontario)
overview of biology of M. paucipunctella and its use in biocontrol in northwestern United States (R.F. Lang, USDA, courtesy Cornell U., New York)
overview of biology of M. paucipunctella and its use in biocontrol in British Columbia (Peter Harris, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada)
distribution of specimens of M. lappella in collection at Mississippi Entomological Museum (Mississippi State U.)
presence in California; list of M. lappella (U. of California at Berkeley)
presence in Florida; list of M. lappella (John Heppner, Florida State Collection of Arthropods)
Works Cited
1.Field Guide to Moths of Eastern North America
Charles V. Covell, Jr. 2005.