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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#905896
wasp? - Labidus coecus

wasp? - Labidus coecus
Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA
April 3, 2014
Size: ~3cm long
This 3cm wasp (or, possibly, a queen ant) came to the light at night 04.03.13. Agile and nervous, it actively searched crevices and ignored a flushed-out spider.
Please help me to identify it.
Thanks -

Andrew

Many at the MV lights the past few weeks
here in south TX. Have to dodge them to photograph the moths. Nice to have the species id for them. Thank you, James!

Moved
This is a male army ant. The red, polymorphic workers may most easily be found under rocks and logs during the cooler months.

Blog with pictures of the workers: http://www.myrmecos.net/2011/02/07/labidus-coecus-masters-of-the-underground/

 
Labidus coecus
Thank you, James, for identifying this ant as Labidus coecus.
Cheers -

Andrew

Moved for expert attention
Moved from ID Request.

Guessing one of the Legionary Ants:


 
The wasp...
Dear Ken:

Thanks for your identification of this critter as the wasp.
Could you kindly try to go a step further to the genus and, possibly, species?
Regards -

Andrew

 
Just sit tight
The ant experts will take it from here. :)

 
Labidus coecus
It was fast.
Thank you, Ken.

Andrew

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