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Species Aroga websteri - Hodges#2201

2201  - Aroga websteri
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Gelechioidea (Twirler Moths and kin)
Family Gelechiidae (Twirler Moths)
Subfamily Gelechiinae
Tribe Gelechiini
Genus Aroga
Species websteri (Aroga websteri - Hodges#2201)
Hodges Number
2201
Other Common Names
Sagebrush defoliator
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Aroga websteri Clarke, 1942
Explanation of Names
Clarke (1942) stated: "This species is named in honor of my friend and former professor. Dr. R.L. Webster, head of the department of zoology, Washington State College."
The common name derives from the fact that the larvae are a major defoliator of Great Basin Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata).
Size
Clarke (1942) listed the wingspan 14-16 mm.
Identification
Specimen determined by DNA analysis (BOLD). (1)
Range
California, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, Washington, and probably Wyoming. [See pg. 14 of Hsiao & Green(1974)]
Few (amateur?) collection records located from Washington, California, and Illinois.
Holotype ♂ & ♀ from Pullman, Washington.
Food
Various species of sagebrush: Artemisia tridentata in the principal host, other species of Artemisia are used when A. tridentata is less available or they are nearby, including A. tripartita, A. arbuscula, A. nova, and A. cana ssp. cana. [See pp. 15-16 of Hsiao & Green(1974)]
Life Cycle
Life history discussed beginning at last paragraph of pg. 5 of the PDF for Hsiao(1972)
Remarks
The larvae are a major defoliator of Great Basin Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), which covers vast areas of the intermountain west between the Rocky Mountains and the Cascade/Sierra Nevada ranges.
See Also
Clarke (1942) stated: "The genitalia of this species most closely resemble those of Aroga rigidae."
Print References
Clarke, J.F.G., (1942). Notes and new species of Microlepidoptera from Washington State. Proceedings of the United States National Museum 92: 273; pl. 29, figs 5-5c; pl. 32, fig. 15.
Hsiao, Ting H. (1972). Demographic Studies of Sagebrush Insects as Functions of Various Environmental Factors. U.S. Int. Biol. Prog., Desert Biome, Logan, UT. RM 72-35 (Full Text)
Hsiao, Ting H., Green Thomas W. (1974). Demographic Studies of Sagebrush Insects as Functions of Various Environmental Factors. Utah St. Univ., Logan, Utah. Reports of 1973 Progress, Volume 3: Process Studies, RM 74-29. (Full Text)
Hsiao, T. H. & Temte, A. K. (1975) Demographic Studies of Sagebrush Insects as Functions of Various Environmental Factors. Progress reports.Paper 78. (Full Text)
Hsiao, T.H., Temte, A.K. (1976). Demographic Studies of Sagebrush Insects as Functions of Various Environmental Factors. U.S. Int. Biol. Prog., Desert Biome, Logan, UT. RM 76-23. (Full Text)