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Photo#91066
beetle family? - Typhaea stercorea

beetle family? - Typhaea stercorea
Medford, (~15 miles east of Philadelphia, PA) Burlington County, New Jersey, USA
July 11, 2006
Size: ~2.8mm
I can't place this one to family on sight. Any ideas? I did admire the very neat rows of blond peachfuzz :)

Images of this individual: tag all
beetle family? - Typhaea stercorea beetle family? - Typhaea stercorea

Typhaea stercorea?

 
Thanks guys
the margin line looks simple (but then I've never seen a "double"). I'll attempt to post a shot of the line if I can find the same individual from the group of these that came to the light that night.

Downie and Arnett only list T. stercorea for Typhaea species for our area (and this does key to Typhaea starting from the family)

probably:
Typhaea sp. in Mycetophagidae - but Diplocoelus in Biphyllidae looks just alike.
To discriminate, check lateral margin of pronotum: with simple lining = Typhaea / lining duplicated = Diplocoelus.

regards, Boris

 
non-NorthAmer?
not knowing my family names very well, I just blanked on a BugGuide search on "Biphyllidae" (and also "Diplocoelus"). Are these European taxa?

 
Not in bugguide yet
It's on the second (ammended) list of missing families I sent you, Tim.

 
oops, that's embarrassing
After doing some homework, it appears that Biphyllidae tarsi are 5-5-5 with 3 & 4 slightly lobed, while Mycetophagidae tarsi are 3/4-4-4, slender, with 1 and 4 much longer than 2 and 3. I'm having some difficulty locating with certainty the same individual photographed here, but looking at the group of these I collected on the same night they clearly are unlobed with 1 and 4 very elongated.

That said, Downie and Arnett indicate 2 Biphyllidae: Diplocoelus sp. for our area, and both distributions mention New Jersey. So I'll have to keep looking at these guys closely.

 
Typhaea then,
at least on the basis of tarsi.

probably . . .
Typhaea sp. in Mycetophagidae - but genus Diplocoelus in Biphyllidae looks just alike.
To tell apart, check lateral edge of pronotum: with simple lining = Typhaea / lateral lining duplicated = Diplocoelus.

regards, Boris