Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada

Subclass Acari - Mites and Ticks

Brown dog Tick - Rhipicephalus sanguineus mite - Balaustium Tick? - Allothrombium Black Walnut Leaf Gall ID Request Tiny mites on bark beetle Amblyomma americanum - female Bioblitz Gall #1 - Eriophyes cerasicrumena Velvet Mite? - Abrolophus
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Chelicerata (Chelicerates)
Class Arachnida (Arachnids)
Subclass Acari (Mites and Ticks)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Taxonomy follows(1)
Explanation of Names
Acari or Acarina
Numbers
ca. 50,000 described spp. worldwide (many times as many undescribed)
Remarks
Six-legged condition: Acarine larvae normally have 6 legs rather than 8, unless that feature has been lost secondarily. Some mites may have no legs at all at some life stages. This condition doesn't follow a particular taxonomic pattern, but is based more on species or life-stage ecology. Parasitic or phoretic mites, in particular, may lack some or even all legs. Some adult mites have 6 legs (one pair lost secondarily), e.g., in Metacheyletia spp. the hind legs are reduced or absent. (Jon Oliver's comments)
Many have complex symbiotic associations with the larger organisms on which they live.
Some are serious pests.
It may not be a monophyletic group.
Internet References
Bee Mites. University of Michigan
Mites. Ecological and Evolutionary Analyses of Life-History Patterns. Marilyn A. Houck
U. Mich. Mites Associated with Bees