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Photo#912674
Geolycosa missouriensis habitat - Geolycosa missouriensis

Geolycosa missouriensis habitat - Geolycosa missouriensis
Vigo County, Indiana, USA
April 23, 2014
Ag field where Geolycosa reside. These sandy fields yield soybeans and corn annually, yet, the spiders survive.

Images of this individual: tag all
Geolycosa missouriensis - female Geolycosa missouriensis - female Geolycosa missouriensis - female Geolycosa missouriensis burrow - Geolycosa missouriensis Geolycosa missouriensis habitat - Geolycosa missouriensis

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Water
Have you tried using warm water to draw out the spider? I remember accidentally killing quite a few spiders accidentally when I dried to dig them out despite me trying to dig around the burrow. Usually I find a chilly day and lightly soak warm water into and near the burrow and the spider will come out to the surface.

 
haven't tried that method
I could see the spider in the burrow as we were digging, we made sure to take our time as to not cave in the burrow. I don't plan on disturbing any more. Just glad I know who lives in the burrows. I will eye shine for males come late summer and fall.

 
It would...
...be interesting if you can breed this species. I have an immature Geolycosa (probably G. missouriensis) within its burrow. I still don't know the sex yet, but I hardly ever see it anyway to gauge how big it is. Judging by the size, I assume it is still immature.

 
going over notes
In Bradley's Common Spiders of North America (2012), he states that missouriensis burrows are shallow in the spring, gravid females sun the egg sacs, by summer the burrows are about 1 meter deep. I will likely get an egg sac from this girl. She is plump

 
1 meter?
That seems a lot deeper than what I would have thought. Perhaps that is how they survive tilling.

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