Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information, insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#9289
Black and orange spotted beetle ?? - Tetraopes femoratus

Black and orange spotted beetle ?? - Tetraopes femoratus
5500 ft elevation, Wyoming, USA
July 2, 2004
about 1/4 inch long

Images of this individual: tag all
Black and orange spotted beetle ?? - Tetraopes femoratus Black and orange spotted beetle ?? - Tetraopes femoratus

Moved
Moved from Milkweed Longhorns.

Moved

Moved
Moved from Milkweed Longhorns.

Red milkweed beetle

 
Tetraopes
I wonder if this is a different species of Tetraopes. The elytral markings are different from the other photos in the guide and there are several species in North America. It doesn't seem to be one of the three species shown at Cedar Creek - the elytral markings resemble the photo of T. femoratus, but this specimen doesn't appear to have white rings on the antennae, at least on the visible segments.

 
Tetraopes femoratus ??
Please notice the second image I just submitted. (I was sleeping and didn't keep track of my images). The white rings are visible here.

 
I think it's femoratus
Definitely not T. tetrophthalmus--the lack of the oblong central spot indicates that. This matches the illustration in Dillon & Dillon for femoratus very closely.

 
I agree with femoratus
See type specimen here.

Also, more information on the Red Milkweed Beetle, T. tetrophthalmus here.

MQ, Austin

Texas Beetle Info
TexasEnto.net/beetles.htm

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.