Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information about the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#93108
Adult Dimorphic Jumping Spider - left palp - Maevia inclemens - male

Adult Dimorphic Jumping Spider - left palp - Maevia inclemens - Male
N40 03.312 W82 53.780, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio, USA
Scale bar is .25mm.

Finally getting a little better with these. 28 exposures combined with Helicon Focus Pro.

Images of this individual: tag all
Adult Dimorphic Jumping Spider - Maevia inclemens - male Adult Dimorphic Jumping Spider - Maevia inclemens - male Adult Dimorphic Jumping Spider - Maevia inclemens - male Adult Dimorphic Jumping Spider - left palp - Maevia inclemens - male

Setup posted
Setup posted here.

Thanks guys
Thanks to all for the encouraging feedback.

Looking back on some of my earlier 'tiny subject' work, I will agree with Gayle and Jeanell that I have understated my results here. The problem is that I know what the full-sized original (unreduced, unsharpened, etc.) looks like, and I'm still trying to resolve more detail for photographing the female epigyna of some spiders where the longest dimension is shorter than the scale bar in this image.

I'm always willing to help others, so I'll post some pullbacks with descriptions. I would have done this earlier but my setup has been constantly evolving.

I'm using a Really Right Stuff B150-B Macro Focusing Rail. It's a solid kick-butt rail, but entirely unnecessary and not the best tool for this work. It occurred to me just a few days ago that all I really need is a 'parts microscope' from eBay... and a hacksaw. I could have saved at least 250 bucks. The scope's focusing stage would provide more precise and much smoother action than any rail designed for field work.

Here is a link to the mostly unprocessed original. The only processing it received was to clean up the background and to remove some of the edge artifacts (halos) left by Helicon Focus.

28 exposures!
absolutely amazing - as Jim suggested, if inclined, please share your techniques. I would love to see how you get that many steps on such a small item - I'll assume taken on a microscope with very fine focus adjustment.

Unbelievable image
Needless to say, your images are second to none. Great job once again.

"a little better" is the ultimate understatement!
This is the fourth time I have been compelled to come back and look at this astounding photo. I heve resisted trying Helicon, as there are not enough hours in each day for me to keep up with my current activities. I guess I will have to take the plunge and give up sleep.
You have set a new standard.
Gayle

Man!
That is inspiring, Jay. Do you use a focusing rail? If you have an extra camera maybe you could post a few photos in our Equipment, etc. section showing elements of your system set up to shoot a palpomere.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.