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Photo#936883
#1 Sexual Behavior of - Colpa octomaculata - male

#1 Sexual Behavior of - Colpa octomaculata - Male
Harris County, Texas, USA
June 1, 2014
Identification verified by George Waldren.
These males were flying around low over a flat field with short, sparse grass, looking for females emerging from underground nests.
Photo #1: Main photo for ID. Male A shows wing venation. Stands on an amber piece of glass that is slightly embedded in the ground.
Photo #2: Female has a red head.
Photo #3: Shows better dorsal view of female thorax. Female’s antennae are smaller than male’s. Male on right arches abdomen in attempt to copulate.
Photo #4: Male B arches abdomen in attempt to copulate with piece of glass.
Photo #5: Male B loses balance. This photo helps illustrate the male’s frenetic zeal to mate.
Photo #6: Male B falls on his side. This photo helps illustrate the male’s frenetic zeal to mate.
Photo #7: Male C attempts to copulate with the piece of glass. This photo and photo #1 show that Male B is not an aberration in the sense that other males are also attracted to the glass.
We should keep in mind that wasps see ultraviolet colors that we cannot see. The attractive colors, if that is what attracts the males, may well be something that we are not seeing. The glass embedded on the surface of the ground may well seem like an emergent female.
I am not an expert. My observations and suppositions may be incorrect.

Images of this individual: tag all
#1 Sexual Behavior of - Colpa octomaculata - male #2 Sexual Behavior of - Colpa octomaculata - male - female #3 Sexual Behavior of - Colpa octomaculata - male - female #4 Sexual Behavior of - Colpa octomaculata - male #5 Sexual Behavior of - Colpa octomaculata - male #6 Sexual Behavior of - Colpa octomaculata - male #7 Sexual Behavior of - Colpa octomaculata - male

Moved
Moved from Campsomeris.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

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