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Photo#939639
Efferia sp. - Efferia triton - male

Efferia sp. - Efferia triton - Male
Miller Canyon, Huachuca Mountains, Cochise County, Arizona, USA
June 15, 2014
Size: Length 21 mm.
Believe it is the same as:

Images of this individual: tag all
Efferia sp. - Efferia triton - male Efferia sp. - Efferia triton - male Efferia sp. - Efferia triton - male Efferia sp. - Efferia triton - male

Moved
Moved from Efferia.

Wings
On both sides have three submarginal cells. If this is a true feature and not the variable form of some of the other groups this is Efferia anomala. I have never seen it. But it has the white parted hairs as with many of the staminea group. The terminal looks close. Will have Dr. Fisher look but these are visually tough.

 
Specimen
Thank you very much for your efforts.
Would you still like the specimen sent to you?

 
If you take images
This well of the specimens then you don't have to mail them to me. Shots of the facial hair and shots of the scutellar hairs up close are also helpful in the males. Nice work.

 
Efferia triton (Osten Sacken)
Efferia triton (Osten Sacken); = E. anomala, authors, not Bellardi. The late Joseph Wilcox published his Efferia revision in 1966, at which time he believed this species was indeed E. anomala. Within 10 years, his ideas about this sp. changed -- as specimens of 'true' anomala (from Sinaloa, Mexico) became available for study. Efferia triton (also described from Sinaloa!) ranges much further north than anomala does, and is available as a replacement name. This is the concept for the species name change as used in the Fisher & Wilcox ms. Nearctic Catalog.

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