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Unidentified Naiads and Exuviae

Exuvia from NV Nymph, likely forktail or dancer (that's what are in the area) Damselfly naiad 2 In small man-made pond BioBlitz Bug 85 Damselfly Larva? Dragonfly Odonata larva
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Odonata (Dragonflies and Damselflies)
Suborder Zygoptera (Damselflies)
No Taxon Unidentified Naiads and Exuviae
Other Common Names
Larvae, Nymphs
Habitat
aquatic: ponds, swamps, streams.
Food
All naiads are voracious predators feeding on everything from small invertebrates such as mosquito larvae to smaller vertebrates such as fish and frogs.
Remarks

Immature odonates are sometimes referred to as larvae or nymphs, but here will be referred to as naiads since they are wholly aquatic hemimetabolis insects as immatures (that is they do not have a pupal stage like beetles and butterflies). Naiads live in most aquatic habitats. Some can even survive in salt water (Corbet 1999). All naiads are voracious predators feeding on everything from small invertebrates such as mosquito larvae to smaller vertebrates such as fish and frogs.

Naiads will molt nine to 17 times before becoming an adult (Corbet 1999). The number of generations per year depends on the species of odonate. Species at higher altitudes or in dry environments usually have one generation per year while those in tropical habitats may undergo multiple generations per year depending on the availability of appropriate habitats.

When naiads are ready for their final molt they leave the water and crawl onto the bank or vegetation where they will molt into adults. Much like a caterpillar emerging from a chrysalis, they will need to pump up their wings and allow their bodies to harden before they can be effective fliers. A newly emerged odonate is teneral (soft). A teneral dragonfly has glossy wings and the colors on the body are often pale. Several days after emmerging hardened completely and will have taken on the colors of an adult dragonfly.
See Also
With their forked tail, superfically, damselfly naiads can resemble mayfly nymphs.
Here's a mayfly larva:

...and a damselfly naiad:
Internet References
University of Puget Sound has images of Lamellae/gills of many NC/SC and Eastern US species.
University of Florida has general info and images.