Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Interested in a 2022 BugGuide gathering in New Mexico?

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

National Moth Week 2020 photos of insects and people.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Previous events


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#95218
Black Water Beetle? - Ilybiosoma

Black Water Beetle? - Ilybiosoma
skull Valley, AZ, Yavapai, Yavapai County, Arizona, USA
February 11, 2007
Size: 9mm
Found near the house near where a sprinkler had been running most of the morning.

Images of this individual: tag all
Black Water Beetle? - Ilybiosoma Black Water Beetle? - Ilybiosoma Black Water Beetle? - Ilybiosoma

Moved
Moved from Agabus.

Moved

Agabus sp.(seriatus?)
Several members of this genus have serial punctures; these belong to the A. seriatus complex which consists of mainly western, stream/river dwelling species. The habitus and shiny black appearance suggests this is A. seriatus..it is perhaps the most widespread of the species complex (transcontinental distribution) The similar A. lugens, which is also found in AZ is broader and less shiny in appearance.

 
added Information
Thanks Tim
I appreciate gettng information on all of these critters!
I got really interested in aquatic invertebrates during my work in waterfowl management,but was unable to pursue it in college.

Water Beetle
I certainly looks like a Predacious Diving Beetle (family Dytiscidae),
to me.

 
I agree.
Long antennae, lack of a ventral "keel" (spine running down the belly) rules out Hydrophilidae.

 
Thanks for the Team effort!
Thanks for the help Eric & Stephen.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.