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Species Longistigma caryae - Giant Bark Aphid

Fun With Birthing - Longistigma caryae Giant Aphid - Longistigma caryae Ladybug Food - Longistigma caryae Another Giant Aphid? - Longistigma caryae Giant Bark Aphid - Longistigma caryae Giant Bark Aphid being tended by Ants. - Longistigma caryae Giant Bark Aphid? - Longistigma caryae Giant Willow Aphid (Tuberolachnus salignus)? - Longistigma caryae
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hemiptera (True Bugs, Cicadas, Hoppers, Aphids and Allies)
Suborder Sternorrhyncha (Plant-parasitic Hemipterans)
Superfamily Aphidoidea
Family Aphididae (Aphids)
Subfamily Lachninae (Giant Aphids)
Tribe Lachnini
Genus Longistigma
Species caryae (Giant Bark Aphid)
Explanation of Names
Longistigma caryae (Harris)
Identification
This is the largest aphid in North America with adults averaging about 1/4 inch long. They also have long legs which makes them appear even larger. Males and some females are winged but egg laying females are wingless. They are brown with black markings (giving them somewhat of a mottled appearance) and have short, black cornicles. When alive they are often partially covered with a bluish white, waxy secretion.
(Info from ento.okstate.edu)
Range
e. US, AZ - Map (1)
Food
American elm, pin oak, live oak, post oak, blackjack oak, pecan, hickory, sycamore, and golden rain tree. Other trees which might be infested include maple, basswood, birch, beech, walnut, chestnut, and willow.
(Info from ento.okstate.edu)
Life Cycle
Activity usually begins in late April in Oklahoma. An adult female gives birth to live young and a colony is formed on the underside of the branches of the host tree. Several generations occur during the summer and fall. Activity continues into mid-November in some years. Late in the fall females lay eggs in bark crevices or on the smooth bark of smaller limbs. The eggs are yellow when laid but later turn black. They are the overwintering stage.
(Info from ento.okstate.edu)
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