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Subspecies Apis mellifera ligustica - Italian Honeybee

Italian Honeybee - Apis mellifera - female
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hymenoptera (Ants, Bees, Wasps and Sawflies)
No Taxon (Aculeata - Ants, Bees and Stinging Wasps)
No Taxon (Anthophila (Apoidea) - Bees)
Family Apidae (Cuckoo, Carpenter, Digger, Bumble, and Honey Bees)
Subfamily Apinae (Honey, Bumble, Long-horned, Orchid, and Digger Bees)
Tribe Apini (Honey Bees)
Genus Apis
Species mellifera (Western Honey Bee)
Subspecies ligustica (Italian Honeybee)
Other Common Names
Golden Honeybee
Explanation of Names
ligustica is Latin for "of Liguria" (an ancient Roman province in what is now Italy)
Identification
A yellow scutellum, and the familiar rings of golden-brown color on the front of the abdomen usually indicate at least a good part of this subspecies in a bee's ancestry. Darker individuals are harder to tell from other subspecies.
Range
The most common and widespread honeybee in our area.
Remarks
First introduced in the mid-1800s, this is by far the most popular subspecies with beekeepers, and has become by far the most common throughout our area as a result.