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Photo#96535
Moth - Ommatospila narcaeusalis

Moth - Ommatospila narcaeusalis
Goliad, Texas, USA
December 14, 2006

5294 -- Pyralid Moth -- Ommatospila narcaeusalis
You will probably notice that I sharpened focus and deepened the contrast of your very nice photo. This is the first photo specimen that I have seen from North America although it is on our checklist as number 5294. The photo shown below was taken on one of the southernmost islands in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, just north of Grenada. Remarkably, many of the moths from that area also sometimes appear in North America along our southern Gulf Coast.


© Fr. Mark de Silva at Moth Photographers Group

 
Wow!
Thanks for the id. How exciting that this species made an appearance in Texas. Who created the checklist that you're using?

 
Checklist
The numbers are from the Checklist of the Lepidoptera of America North of Mexico (1983) by R. W. Hodges and others. It is frequently referred to as the MONA Checklist or Hodges Checklist. It is by now quite out of date and a revision of it is planned.

This
looks like a moth in subfamily Pyraustinae.
It also looks like an easy ID for someone who knows moths.

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