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Photos of insects and people from the 2022 BugGuide gathering in New Mexico, July 20-24

National Moth Week was July 23-31, 2022! See moth submissions.

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Photos of insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12


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Subspecies Apheloria virginiensis corrugata

Apheloria virginiensis corrugata - Apheloria virginiensis Apheloria virginiensis? - Apheloria virginiensis - female Apheloria virginiensis corrugata - Apheloria virginiensis Possible Apheloria millipede? - Apheloria virginiensis Possible Apheloria millipede? - Apheloria virginiensis xystodesmidae? - Apheloria virginiensis Millipede - Apheloria virginiensis Possible Apheloria virginiensis - Apheloria virginiensis
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Myriapoda (Myriapods)
Class Diplopoda (Millipedes)
Order Polydesmida (Flat-backed Millipedes)
Family Xystodesmidae
Tribe Apheloriini
Genus Apheloria
Species virginiensis (Apheloria virginiensis)
Subspecies corrugata (Apheloria virginiensis corrugata)
Remarks
Caution: Many millipedes with bright color patterns secrete a compound containing cyanide. Wash your hands after handling them and do not allow children to pick them up.

"Millipedes are entirely non-toxic to humans and can be picked up by hand. Some secretions discolor the skin, but this wears away in a few days without lasting effect. Some large, cylindrical, tropical species squirt their defensive secretions up to a half meter (2-3 feet) and can blind chickens and dogs. Their fluids are painful if they get into the eyes, and persons working with tropical millipedes should be suitably cautious." ~Rowland Shelley