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Photo#97824
Tan borers - Ips grandicollis

Tan borers - Ips grandicollis
Nashua, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
March 1, 2007
Size: about 4.3 mm
I found adults and larvae under bark, apparently in the same subcortical galleries. I never saw any of the adults move so I presume they were dead when I found them, even though nine days passed before I found time to shoot them and in that time they could certainly have expired.

Images of this individual: tag all
Tan borers - Ips grandicollis Tan borers - Ips grandicollis Tan borers - Ips grandicollis Tan borers - Ips grandicollis

Moved tentatively
Moved from Scolytini.

Moved

Ips or Pityokteines sp.
. . . by appearance, size, habitat and mode of galleries. I cannot decide, however!

cheers, Boris

 
I suppose I should shoot the galleries
for any borers I find. Their pattern is sometimes diagnostic for taxon. Anyway, thanks for the possible ID(s).

They may be teneral individua
They may be teneral individuals that had not darkened(hardened) up yet. I find many Scolytids with some individuals still very pale for this reason in galleries with fully hardened and dark specimens. Look like they came from Pine.

 
Yes, they came from pine,
but I don't think they're teneral. I found some more today and they had definitely been dead for awhile.

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