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Photo#98414
Another Dermestid - Attagenus unicolor - female

Another Dermestid - Attagenus unicolor - Female
Guelph, Wellington, Ontario, Canada
March 15, 2007
Size: 5 mm
Same species as the one I found a week ago, just a different and larger individual (I assume that would make this a female?). It was along a couch, spooking a friend in the process before I brushed it into a jar. This view of the insect's belly shows the large eyes, antenna structure and fine body hair. The slight discoloring of the abdomen was caused by a smudge in the camera lens, which I had not noticed until after I took this photograph.

Images of this individual: tag all
Another Dermestid - Attagenus unicolor - female Another Dermestid - Attagenus unicolor

Moved
Moved from Attagenus. In Ontario, there is only one confirmed Attagenus species, with two subspecies unicolor and japonicus.

male vs. female
Dear Stephen,

when you compare both Attagenus you posted, you may recognize that the last antennal segment in this one (female) is a little shorter than the two preceeding, whiler in the other (male), it is considerably longer.
This kind of sexual dimorphism is common in Dermestidae, and may be even more pronounced in Attagenus.

cheers, Boris

 
Wow!
I did notice that there was something different about the antennae, but it didn't occur to me that this is sexual dimorphism. Thanks again!

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