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Photo#99243
38 pairs of legs - Strigamia branneri

38 pairs of legs - Strigamia branneri
Groton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA
March 23, 2007
Size: ~4cm
Found in the leaf litter.

Images of this individual: tag all
38 pairs of legs - Strigamia branneri 38 pairs of legs - Strigamia branneri 38 pairs of legs - Strigamia branneri

Moved
Moved from Soil Centipedes.
Thanks Joseph!

Strigamia branneri
An odd one. The leg count is actually 39 (including the terminal legs and a tiny pair by the head). Usually diamond-backed pedes from this region are G. vittatus, but male S. branneri always have 39 pairs (way fewer than any Geophilus) and the tapering of the body toward the head ... This is definitely Strigamia branneri, but a ways outside of its recorded range (nearest record is Ithaca, NY). Though to be fair, Crabill (1952) suggested this species had not been well-documented.

Great find!

Crabill, Jr., R. E. (1952). The centipedes of northeastern North America. (Doctoral dissertation). [Microfilm]. (Film 4713, reel 154, no. 1).

Thanks Rowland
It looked like a soil centipede to me, but the description on the info page in bugguide says they always have an odd number of legs.

A representative of the order
A representative of the order Geophilomorpha

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