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Photo#99786
What is this tiny little bug?? - Anthrenus verbasci

What is this tiny little bug?? - Anthrenus verbasci
Austin, Texas, USA
March 26, 2007
Size: 3-4mm in length
I have been seeing several of these bugs lately roaming around inside my 2nd floor apartment. I'm not sure if they are indoor or outdoor bugs, but they are so tiny that they can easily get inside. They do have wings and can fly. My guess is that it is some type of small leaf beetle. I've never noticed them before, and I don't want them overtaking my apartment!! It has also been raining a lot lately here, so maybe they come out during rains?? Any help identifying this would be appreciated!

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What is this tiny little bug?? - Anthrenus verbasci What is this tiny little bug?? - Anthrenus verbasci

Moved
Moved from carpet beetles.

Moved
Moved from Beetles.

Oh yes,
Their favorite food is dead insects. So they could be grazing on the mounds of dead ladybugs, flies, wasps, etc. that accumulate between the windows and screens/storm windows.

Carpet Beetles, genus Anthrenus.
They likely live and reproduce inside your home, eating furs, woolens, wool rugs or wall hangings, fallen human or pet hairs and skin flakes, and even stray food scraps that might have gotten kicked under the stove or fridge.

 
Nice job of photography and reporting
Welcome to Bug Guide. Hope we see more.

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